Saturday, March 31, 2007

The North-West Corner

















It changed regularly. I moved plants around probably more than I should have, but I was willing to risk mistakes because there's no better way to learn (trial and error). Sometimes plants behave differently than expected, and that's okay - I'm willing to accommodate.

I had a very small space, less than half that I do now. The north-west corner began as my primary "butterfly garden" but as some plants (ahem, Delphiniums, Speedwell) grew uncontrollable, billowing, and drooping all over the others, who, over the years changed faces from time to time until it became mob of representatives. Bugleweed (ajuga) smothered the creeping Plox but there were still plenty of prickly purple blooms last year to prove that Plox can't so easily be outed. I had (surprisingly) some Coreopsis (C. verticillata ‘Moonbeam’ ) that reappeared year after year, I know, I don't believe it either, but it was there, beaming out from within the thicket.

Rudbeckia became a smash hit last year with a swarm of brown eyed blooms, that mixed so well with the Veronica. There were Daisies too, but they just came out of nowhere (from some planting at some time, but they had naturalized to the area, which pleased me muchly. I did nothing but thank them for coming). The painted Daisies were removed, and I don't think I'll try them again. They were spindly.

Those Delphiniums. What can I say - I love that plant, but groan at the thought of the maintenance. I'll plant them again in the new garden because I do like (love them) them and I can't imagine a cottage garden without them. I've never had great luck with Foxglove, but I will plant those again too. Lupins though, no....we'll leave those wolves in the woods, thanks. Too bad - they remind me of being young, in my jungle.

Hydrangea, yes - I need one of those. Which one will depend on what I can find. That Weigela made an incredible show the last few years, another one of those is on my list (the hummingbirds loved it). There were Butterfly Delphiniums in there too, and some white Jacob's Ladder, Tall Garden Pholx (pink) (but I think that got smothered by the speedwell). Heuchera Coral Bells, and some moonbeam Yarrow were also planted.

The rose was Winchester Cathedral (where my parents once watched the changing of the bells *how romantic*). It didn't survive last year, but it is the first rose on my list for the new beds. At the time of the picture here, I hadn't planted anything in that spot yet - so there's a gap. Winnipeg Parks was chosen and planted a little late in the season - I took it with me in the move so we'll just have to wait and see how it does. (it doesn't look dead) (it's in the bed by the porch now) Winchester was perfect in the northwest corner, I really loved that rose - blooms the size of softballs. I could smell them in Hannah's room.

Double River Wye is my favorite Daylily (most of the time, sometimes I have a hard time choosing a favorite). This one, -it's sooo pretty, the most delicious buttery-lemony yellow double blooms non-stop. (I noticed that Vanilla Fluff looks very similar, only it's color (of course) is vanilla.) Double River Wye became entangled the branches of the Weigela last year, squeezing blooms through all over the place.

The snowmound Spirea looked quite dramatic the evening I took these pictures. It was dark because of storm clouds, not the hour making the white really pop from the plant. Beside it used to be the old fashioned rose, Heritage, which year after year grew beautiful and strong but sadly, almost every bud suffered decapitation by chipmunk. Oh, I was so angry with those rodents! I will try Heritage again in the new beds. It's blooms are big like Winchester's, and I remember them being a peachy-rose-pink, a great color.



They sky that evening (when I took these dark photographs), after the storm, was amazing.